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  • Assessment

    Welcome to the Assessment area for the Department of Music.  Initially developed by Bruce Saperston, Ph.D., music department head from 1993-2007, this site offers visitors an overview of how our department continually works to improve its programs.  Our disciplines are constantly on the move, and this site allows the public to see how the faculty of our department consistently works to align our curricula with the trajectory of the profession.  We welcome your interest and your feedback on our programs.

     

    In the context of a comprehensive land grant University, the mission of the Department of Music is to develop and maintain nationally recognized programs in Music Education, Music Performance, and Music Therapy. This is done in order to enrich the cultural and educational life of the regional community to: serve the physical and mental health needs of disabled citizens, transmit the musical tradition of western and other cultures to future generations, and contribute to the growth and vitality of those traditions through creative artistic activities and research.

    This mission is accomplished in relation to the following general activities:
     
      a.   To prepare students for successful careers through professional training in music education, performance/pedagogy, and music therapy.
      b.   To contribute to the liberal education of the undergraduate student body providing courses of the Liberal Arts and Sciences Program of the Colleges of Humanities, Arts & Social Science and Science, and the General Education Program of the University.
      c.   To promote involvement in quality amateur music-making by providing courses and programs of interest to the general university student and the pre-university student who elects to increase his/her understanding of music and skills in individual or group performance.
      d.   To assist in maintaining responsive and cordial relationships with the public and to contribute to the cultural life of the University and the community by providing concerts, recitals, festivals, other musical performances, joint musical ventures and other services.
      e.   To contribute to the development, restoration and quality of life of disabled individuals of all ages in Utah, the nation, and the world through the education and training of professional music therapist and the work of music therapy faculty;
      f.   To add to the knowledge, experience and maturity of the profession and the respect extended to it, through the endeavors of the faculty.
     
    Objectives Common to All Professional Baccalaureate Degrees (Music Performance, Piano Pedagogy, Music Education, Music Therapy:
     

     

    1.

     

    To develop knowledge and skills related to basic piano keyboard instruction including basic keyboard techniques and fingerings; scales, triads, seventh chords; progression and resolution of diatonic and chromatic chords; harmonization of melodies; transposition of chord progressions to different keys; arpeggios; practicing and learning pieces.

     

    2.

     

    To develop knowledge of the history of music including the repertory of various periods and cultures.

     

    3.

     

    To develop knowledge and skills in theory and ear training including traditional harmony and part writing, 20th Century musical techniques and music sight reading and ear training.

     

    4.

     

    To develop knowledge and skills in the use of technology as it applies to notating, arranging, and composing music.

     

    5.

     

    To develop knowledge and skills related to the student's understanding of rehearsal techniques, and his/her abilities in the ensemble performance as well as the knowledge of music literature and conducting skills.

     

    6.

     

    To develop knowledge and skills on a major instrument or voice which includes performance of a cross-section of the music from the complete repertory of the instrument of voice studied, the development of appropriate technical skills requisite for artistic self-expression, and the development of the ability to read at sight.

     
    Additional Objectives for Music Education Majors:
     

     

    1.

     

    An understanding of child development and the identification and understanding of the principles of learning.

     

    2.

     

    An understanding of philosophical and social foundations underlying music in education and the ability to express a rationale for personal attitudes and beliefs.

     

    3.

     

    Ability to assess aptitudes, experiential backgrounds and interests of individual and groups of students and to devise learning experiences to meet assessed needs.

     

    4.

     

    Knowledge of current methods and materials available in all fields and levels of Music Education.

     

    5.

     

    An understanding of evaluative techniques and ability to apply them in assessing both the musical progress of students and the objectives and procedures of the curriculum.

     

    6.

     

    An awareness of the developmental process involved in becoming a successful teacher.

     
    Additional Objectives for Music Therapy Majors:
     
     

    1.

     

    To be able to present oneself as a skilled musician demonstrating proficiency and functional therapeutic musical skills in piano, voice, guitar and major performing instrument/voice.

     

    2.

     

    To be able to utilize a variety of musical styles from various periods and cultures to facilitate therapeutic intervention.

     

    3.

     

    To become an effective therapist through self-inquiry, authenticity, and an understanding of the dynamics of the therapist/client relationship.

     

    4.

     

    To develop knowledge concerning the cultural, sociological, psychological and biological perspectives of music as a phenomena of humanity.

     

    5.

     

    To be able to accurately assess the needs of a variety of clinical populations and develop appropriate music therapy treatment protocols for individual and group settings.

     

    6.

     

    To develop an appropriate and effective clinical writing style to document client response and progress, and to contribute to the professional body of knowledge through research and scholar publications.

     

    7.

     

    To cultivate and shape an individual's unique therapeutic style through continual/ongoing personal and professional growth and development.


     
    While evaluation, planning, and projection activities have always been an integral part of the Department's on-going operations, the Department was extensively engaged in such activities during the past decade in preparation for the University's Reaccreditation by the Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges in 1996, conversion to the semester calendar in AY 1998-99, and Reaccreditation by NASM in 2001. Specific methodologies used for evaluation, planning, and projections which employ both internal and external indicators of student achievement and specific mechanisms for assessing teaching and curricula are delineated in the Department's evaluation grid presented below. This comprehensive description of the Department's evaluation methods was initially developed in 1998 when it first appeared on the Department's home page. This grid represents a living document and has undergone minimal modifications to better meet departmental needs.
     
    During the 2008-09 academic year, the Department of Music developed a rubric for assessing student achievement of learning objectives. Data will be collected during the 2009-10 academic year. The rubric will be applied to data points distributed across the undergraduate career of a sample of students at the time of graduation. Faculty anticipate using the data obtained from the rubric, in addition to other outcomes data such as employment data and graduate school placement, to make curricular changes in response to outcomes observed. Download a .pdf of Outcomes. 
     

    Department of Music
    Caine College of the Arts
    Utah State University

     

    Information About Students
     
    Areas Activity Method Population Information When How Used
    Entry-Level
    1 Music Majors-- Individual Performance (instrumental/ voice) Audition/Jury Live or Recorded Performance All incoming music majors Performance level (12 levels) Admission Evaluate for admission/provide performance baseline
    2 Music Therapy Majors--Major Instrument & Functional Performance Skills (Piano, Guitar, Voice) Audition Live Performance Incoming music therapy majors Level of vocal, accompanying & piano/ guitar performance skills Prior to admission Determine skills appropriate for major
    3 Music Therapy Majors Interview Questionnaire Incoming music therapy majors Motivations, expectations, etc. Prior to admission Evaluate personal characteristics relevant to major
    Entry to Sophomore Year
    4 All Music Majors-- Individual Performance (instrumental/ voice) Jury Adjudication of Live performance All music majors Individual Performance Level (must complete Proficiency Level 1) Spring Semester Freshman year Evaluate progress & continuance in major
    Entry to Junior Year
    5 Music Majors-- Individual Performance (instrumental/ voice) Jury Adjudication of live performance All music majors Individual Performance Levels as follows: Music Education-- Level 3;
    Music Performance-- Level 5;
    Piano Pedagogy-- Level 5
    Spring semester sophomore year or entry audition for transfer students Evaluate progress & continuance in major
    6 Music Therapy Majors Functional music skills proficiency exam Adjudication of live performance All music therapy majors Individual Performance Level (must complete Proficiency Level 1) Fall Sophomore Year (may retake beginning of fall junior year) Evaluate progress & continuance in major
    Graduation Requirements
    7 Music Majors Jury Adjudication of live performance All music majors Individual Performance Levels as follows: Music Education-- Level 6;
    Music Performance-- Level 9;
    Piano Pedagogy-- Level 7
    Spring or final semester senior year Evaluate progress & graduation
    8 Music Therapy Majors Jury Adjudication of live performance All music therapy majors Individual Performance Level 6 Spring or final semester senior year Evaluate progress & graduation
    9 Music Therapy Majors Functional music skills proficiency exam Adjudication of live performance All music therapy majors Individual Performance Level(must complete Proficiency Level 2) Fall semester senior year or one semester before completion of other on-campus requirements Evaluate progress & entry to clinical internship
    10 Music Majors Senior Recital Adjudication of live performance All music majors Individual Performance levels as follows:
    Music Education-- Level 6;
    Music Performance-- Level 9;
    Piano Pedagogy-- Level 7
    Senior Year Evaluate progress& graduation
    11 Music Majors & Music Therapy Majors Piano Proficiency Final exam for MUS 2170 or Individual Proficiency examination Music Majors & Music Therapy Majors Mastery of basic piano skills (criteria in Student Handbook, p. 19) Spring of sophomore year and/or before graduation Evaluate progress & graduation

    Information About Curriculum and Teaching
    Areas Activity Method Population Information When How Used
    1 Mission Statements & Objectives Faculty review of mission statement and related objectives Faculty discussion Faculty feedback Fall department retreat Mission statement and objectives revised as necessary & made available to students in handbook and web page
    2 Program Area Curriculum review Review of syllabi in each program area Discussion by area faculty Possible revision of objectives or course content Fall department retreat Modification of curriculum
    3 Curriculum Committee Review Review of recommended changes from program area Curriculum Committee review and discussion Input relevant to proposed revisions At least annually Modification of curriculum
    4 General Department Curriculum Review Review of recommended changes as approved by Curriculum Committee Review & discussion by full faculty Input relevant to proposed revisions At least annually Modification of curricula
    5 Core Curriculum Review General review of core curriculum and methods by full faculty Review & discussion by full faculty Faculty views on strengths & weakness of curriculum & methods On-going To assess effectiveness & coherence of curriculum & methods
    6 Curriculum & Teaching Review External Review of Curriculum Site visits Outsides review of strengths & weaknesses of curriculum & methods Accreditation reviews by National Association of Schools of Music, AMTA, NASC; Regents reviews Modification of curricula
    7 Core Curriculum & Teaching Review of students progress in theory courses Theory faculty report dispersion of grades in theory sections Data indicative of inconsistencies between sections and/or possible methodological problems Mid-term Possible indication of problems in curriculum or teaching methods
    8 Teaching Student Evaluation of Teaching USU Teaching evaluation Form Student perception of quality of class & instruction Each term Modification of teaching methods & course objectives
    9 Applied Instruction Jury Guest adjudicators Outside experts perception of quality of instructions Biannually for each area Modification of teaching methods
    10 Teaching Self evaluation of teaching Annual self evaluation summary for committee: teaching portfolio Introspective view of teaching over time Updated annually for file Teaching improvement
    11 Teaching Peer mentoring Peer visits to classroom Feedback from peer relevant to teaching methods At the discretion of faculty an annually by T/P Committee members Teaching Improvements
    12 Integration of University Studies Competencies in Departmental Courses Comparison of course goals with University Studies competencies Mapping Shows how Department course goals support University Studies competencies Annually To assess relevance of Music curriculum to University Studies
    13 Music Education Music Department Advisory Board Advisory Board Meetings Community educator's perceptions of quality of student preparedness Spring term Curricular change
    14 Music Therapy Clinical internship at external sites across nation 3-month & 6-month evaluations by clinical training director & feedback from questionnaire Feedback regarding student's knowledge, skills, & preparation Every Term Modification of music therapy curriculum and teaching methods
    15 Music Therapy Majors National Board Certification Exam Standardized exam Music therapy graduates Student's knowledge in areas related to music therapy curriculum Annually at national test sites
    16 All Operations (i.e., curricula, teaching, physical plant, equipment, etc.) Graduating students complete questionnaire Graduating students complete questionnaire Feedback relevant to all aspects of department's operations Spring term Determine strengths & weakness in department
    17 All Operations (i.e., curricula, teaching, physical plant, equipment,etc.) Exit interview Graduating students interview with department head Feedback relevant to all aspects of department's operations Spring term Determine strengths & weakness in department

    Information About Placement and Advancement
    Activity Method Population Information When How Used

    1

    Music Majors & Music Therapy Majors

    USU Placement Survey

    Survey Completed by faculty

    Music Majors & Music Therapy Majors

    One-year follow up of graduate's success in terms of employment &/or graduate studies

    Spring semester

    Evaluate success of program

    2

    Music Majors & Music Therapy Majors

    Follow-up Questionnaire

    Questionnaire mailed to music alumni

    Music Majors & Music Therapy Majors

    Feedback from students relevant to professional preparedness

    2-years post graduation

    Evaluate success of program


     
    MAJOR CURRICULAR REVISIONS AND PROGRAM INNOVATIONS IMPLEMENTED BETWEEN FALL 2003 AND SPRING 2009

    The department has made a concerted effort to enhance and enrich the curriculum by bringing leaders in the field to campus for master classes, concerts and residencies. Collaboration with organizations such as the Chamber Music Society of Logan and generous funding from the Marie Eccles Caine Foundation have made this possible. A partial list of these guest artists and teachers includes:

    2008-09

    Drummer Jay Lawrence
    Guitarist Vic Juris
    Drummer Danny Gottlieb
    Guitarist Jamie Findlay
    Saxophonist Brent Jensen
    Saxophonist Tom Walsh
    Trumpeter Bob Taylor
    Hot Club of San Francisco
    Pianist Mel Shore
    Jazz Educator Gene Aitken
    Trumpeter Dominic Spera
    Trumpeter Byron Stripling
    Imani Winds
    Army Ground Forces Band Quintet
    Calder Trio
    LA Guitar Quartet
    Pacifica Quartet
    Guitarist Jack Peterson
    Suzuki String Pedagogues Mimi Zweig, Judy Bossuat, Carey Cheney

    2007-08

    Berlin Philharmonic Wind Quintet
    Cellist Paul Kat
    Jupiter Quartet
    Ying Quartet
    Amelia Piano Trio
    Perlman-Bailey-Schmidt Trio
    Cypress Quartet

     

    The following curriculum changes were implemented as a result of feedback from faculty, students and community music professionals.

    2008-09 Academic Year 

    Reactivation of the Master of Education degree with music emphasis to serve music   education professionals in rural areas of the state.

    This degree involved new course development in response to increased need for                    professional development for secondary instrumental music teachers, some of which was undertaken with grant support from the Dana Foundation:

    MUSC 6100: Graduate Instrumental Conducting
    MUSC 6120: Advanced Rehearsal Techniques
    MUSC 6130: Graduate Wind Literature


    MUSC 3240 (Inclusion of MLR): Instrumental Score Reading Program (error detection workbook and CD series)

    MUSC 2700 (Woodwind Techniques I): Introduce recorded tracks for Band Method. Use SmartMusic to demonstrate program's capability of targeting skills by creating assignments.

    MUSC 3260 (Music and Methods for the Elementary School Classroom Teacher): Instead of peer teaching a final project, students are now videotaping practicum teaching assignments with elementary children for viewing in class. Major changes in use of Blackboard Vista. Students are given credit for attending music education professional development workshops.

    MUSC 3710 (Private Instruction Flute): Using SmartMusic for accompaniments when pianists not available and/or to increase efficiency of practice time with pianists provided by accompanying class or scholarship.

     

    2007-08 Academic Year

    MUSC 2310 (Introduction to Observational and Behavioral Methods in Music Therapy): Integrated new textbook to improve content in behavioral techniques and a new term project to broaden scope of clinical practice addressed.

    MUSC 2660, 2670, and 2680 (Italian, French, and German Diction for Singers): Adopted a new workbook text (for all classes), and new book with study CD (for German), as well as newrecording examples by (native speaking)professional singers. Brought into the classroom local native speakers/faculty as visitors, as well as recent student guest from Germany for two weeks, with contacts for study programs in Germany, and Austria; provides comparison with conversational pronunciation and singing lyric diction pronunciation rules which differ slightly. Additional class projects include practicum teaching experience to heighten student involvement and more accurate learning with better retention.

    MUSC 3110, 3120, and 3190 (Music History I, II and III) Adapted the most recent editions of score anthologies, recordings, and source reading and constructed websites for each class, which include supplemental music examples, art images discussed in class, online journal assignments, online forums for class discussions and announcements, review sheets for exams, student grades, and contact information.

    MUSC 3220 (Choral Methods): Revised to include bringing in local high school teachers to discuss teaching issues with the students. It gives the students a chance to ask point-blank questions regarding their concerns about teaching in today's classroom. A new textbook, DIRECTING THE CHORAL MUSIC PROGRAM, which includes a list of several discussion topics and project ideas at the end of each chapter, was also adopted for this course.

    MUSC 3240 (Secondary Instrumental Methods) Added Instrumental Score Reading Program to curriculum in response to need for score reading/error detection skills on Praxis tests. Invited guest lecturers from public schools to give presentations on Smartmusic and other classroom technologies.

    MUSC 3260 (Elementary Music Methods): A hybrid section of the class was added to address the need for this course at USU regional campuses and extension centers. This new version of the course, which integrates Blackboard (also used in the face-to-face version), relies on IP video and numerous opportunities for students at remote sites to observe elementary school via distance modalities and opportunities for individual and group practice and assessment.

    MUSC 3310 (Music Therapy and the Exceptional Child): Included more experiential work during classes.

    MUSC 3520 (String Pedagogy and Solo Literature): Introduced intensive training in Suzuki Method by bringing guest Upper Strings and Cello String Pedagogy teachers who are certified to teach Suzuki Teacher Training.

    MUSC 3600 (Opera Theatre): Introduced a guest stage director program underwritten by the Caine Foundation to bring our students into contact with a professional director. Also introduced operatic performances with full orchestra and international performance opportunities for the opera students in alternating years.

    MUSC 4510, 4520, 4530, 4540 (Individual Instruction for String Instrument Majors): Introduced studio class "swaps" – teachers teach another teacher's studio twice per semester and Sculpting Sound series in the art museum – student chamber music master classes conducted for the public in the Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art, team-taught by entire string faculty. Increased use of technology: CD recording instituted in private studios for improved student self-assessment and review of lesson material. Also allows students to record themselves for mailed auditions, ie: summer programs, graduate schools, etc.

    MUSC 4930 (Readings/Conference): Many faculty members choose to offer individual students intensive study of a special topic under this number. Curricula are as varied as the specialties of our faculty and include historical and pedagogical research, special chamber music performances and analyses of musical works not part of the regular curriculum.

    HONR 1330 Revised the custom course reader, and modified the assigned music, art, and poetry in the syllabus. Moved the location of the class into a technology-enhanced classroom to facilitate multi-media lectures and student presentations.

    HONR 2100 Invited a new assortment of guest speakers from the departments of art, music, and theatre to speak with the students about innovative career and grant opportunities in the arts.

    2006-07 Academic Year and Prior

    • A new course, MUSC 4240, Advanced Conducting, was added to the music education curriculum in the emphasis areas of wind and percussion, string and choral music. The purpose of this course is to provide additional instruction in rehearsal techniques and conducting.
    • A new course, MUSC 4210, Advanced Musical Form and Analysis, was approved and will be implemented during the next academic year to provide performance majors and composition students with more in-depth analysis studies.
    • In the past, Music Theory IV and Music History III were provided in one course on 20th Century Music. Student and faculty feedback led to the decision to provide these content areas under two new courses, MUSC 3130, Music Theory IV, and MUSC 3190, Music History III. In addition, it was decided to integrate music from diverse cultures throughout the department's history sequence with a large component of world music included in the MUSC 3190 course.
    • A new course, MUSC 4710, Jazz Combo, was developed to provide jazz students with wider opportunities to develop their improvisational skills and to perform.
    • A new course, MUSC 4720, Saxophone Quartet, was developed to provide saxophone students with small ensemble experiences in order to improve their performance abilities.
    • A new section of USU 1330, Creative Arts, has been developed as an honors course and will be provided in addition to the Department's regular USU 1330 offering.
    • A new contemporary music ensemble, Musica Viva, was developed during AY 2003-04 in order to provide select students and faculty members opportunities to perform contemporary compositions.
    • The Department acquired two new faculty positions during the past two years in keeping with recommendations from the NASM re-accreditation report. These positions are a new opera director and historian/musicologist.
    • The Music Department has collaborated with Partners of Americas in providing outreach activities by our faculty members and students to Guatemala.
    • The Music Department's Piano Proficiency requirements were revised based upon faculty and student input.

    CURRICULAR REVISIONS IMPLEMENTED BETWEEN FALL 2005 AND FALL 2006

    PROFESSOR BALLAM

    MU1620 INTRO TO OPERA

    All lectures have been video-taped, and the course has been added to the distance learning program for individual study on line.

    MU1610 INTRO TO MUSICAL THEATRE

    All lectures have been video-taped, and the course has been added to the distance learning program for individual study on line.

    USU1330 Audio recordings of daily lectures are now on WebCT for student review at the end of each day. Some exams are given on WebCT as well

    PROFESSOR BERNAL

    * Added to the Theory III curriculum the study of species counterpoint, as this content is not covered otherwise in the core curriculum.

    PROFESSOR CHRISTIANSEN

    I developed a custom white board (involving colored magnets and guitar grids), which is being used in teaching the Fingerboard Theory Course.

    Our guitar juries are being video taped and sent to professional guitarists in other parts of the country for review.

    We are now using the Fingerboard Theory for Guitar text in the fingerboard theory course.

    PROFESSOR EVANS

    Modifications in choral education classes

    1. (MUSC 3220) Choral Methods (changes made for academic year 2006-2007)

    New text book:

    Directing the Choral Music Program Kenneth A. Phillips

    Oxford University Press

    ISBN 0-19-513282-3

    *this text was adopted because it more comprehensively covers facets of teaching strategies in high school and junior high choral programs. Each chapter contains discussion topics, which allow in-class presentations by students, a big reason for the text change. Students are now allowed more time presenting material in front of the class, a valuable prep for teaching in the workforce.

    1. (MUSC 3230) Choral Literature (changes made for academic year 2005-2006)

    Content addition:

    *In addition to covering all important periods of choral music literature as outlined in the current text, I have added additional topics of multicultural literature and pop/jazz/show choir literature. These allow the students to have exposure to high school/junior high-appropriate multicultural literature to enhance their ability to reach out to students of different cultural backgrounds and prepare concerts for a diverse society. The pop/jazz/show choir literature section enhances a prospective teacher's ability to be hired in a program with an existing show choir, or to begin one themselves.

    Content addition:

    *for the section on choral music of the Classical period, I have obtained a CD with copies of Mozart's original manuscript for his "Requiem," enabling us to use an overhead lcd projector to view Mozart's original markings, etc. This enables an accurate view into compositional techniques of the period.

    Content addition: *I have included a section on designing a program and promotional materials for a concert based on the periods of choral literature composition discussed in class. This allows students to select material for a concert based on similarities and themes of choral music, and develop a visual publicity strategy (posters, flyers, mailers, etc.), which corresponds to the literature selected.

    PROFESSOR GRIFFIN

    In my course, Computer Applications in Music (2180) as of Fall 2006, students are asked to research the internet with regard to historical topics, individuals, musical instruments, that are important in the area of electronic music. Students present their findings in written form and also share by giving a brief in-class presentation. Since I now have remote access to all of the workstations in the lab simultaneously, I can give presentations or access WEB sites and display the information to all of the students on their individual workstations.

    PROFESSOR GUDMUNDSON

    Changes in the jazz area:

    - Started student chapter of IAJE (Int'l Ass'n for Jazz Education) this school year. Several members of this student club traveled to NYC for the 2007 Int'l Conference in January. Reason: to further student awareness of jazz and jazz education at USU and in the Cache Valley area.

    - The USU Student Chapter of IAJE sponsors monthly jam sessions in the community (began Feb 2007) that feature a prominent regional jazz artist, and that are open to jazz musicians throughout the area. Reason: to improve students' improvisation skills, and knowledge of contemporary jazz performance practice.

    - MUSC 3900 Jazz Improvisation now includes a performance with live rhythm section component. Reason: to provide relevant, "real world" experience to our music students, many of whom will need these skills in their teaching, therapy, and performance careers. Instigated after a peer review.

    - MUSC 3020 Jazz History now has all listening available on WebCT. Reason: most students prefer this mode of access (on their own computers, rather than having to go to the library).

    - MUSC 3900 now has more focus specifically on rhythm, including assignment calling for rewriting of standard rhythms to jazz rhythms. Reason: rhythm is the most important aspect of the music, and it is often the most difficult stylistic aspect for students to grasp. Instigated after a peer review.

    - MUSC 3900 students now are required to write out a jazz "improvisation." Reason: students can find more success when they have the luxury of time in crafting a solo, and then are able to read it off the page. Also, they can get more specific feedback on their solos before refining them. Instigated after a peer review.

    PROFESSOR KEISKER

    MUS 3600 Opera Theatre (2005-2006; 2006-2007) double casting; expanded roles; orchestra Spring 2007; increased variety and difficulty of repertoire in 2005-2006 and 2006-2007; international travel performance/teaching experience made available at nominal cost including grant writing (including financial awards); additional materials on library reserve; refined, more efficient rehearsal calendars; larger office space and grand piano allows for more rehearsal time and assistance available outside of class room hours by appointment; syllabus and weekly coaching/rehearsal schedules sent to all students via email in addition to bulletin board postings; guest artists and stage directors of international reputation for master classes, available to other students outside of opera as well; invitation to local schools for special performances; continually expanding community outreach

    MUS 3610 Vocal Repertory I (Fall 2004 and Fall 2006)

    MUS 3620 Vocal Repertory II (Spring 2005 and Spring 2007) additional repertoire covered; class performance participation including student guest performers and/or visiting guest artists; added lecture/performance projects (favorite part of class for students); added materials on reserve; syllabus and assignments via email to each class participant; new edition of text; rhetoric associate added to second semester (VRII in Spring)

    MUS 2660 Italian Diction (Spring 2005, 2006, 2007) texts updated, some added, new workbooks; added Italian song repertoire; students teach review sessions with printed outline/study sheets (positive response from student evaluations); students learn to evaluate peers

    MUS 2670 German Diction (Fall 2005, 2006, 2007) study sheets added, additional texts available on reserve and utilized new material; personalized repertoire assignments for class performance; students teach review sessions with printed outline/study sheets (positive response from student evaluations); students learn to evaluate peers

    MUS 2680 French Diction (Spring 2004, 2006) additional study tapes as aural material; assignments related to repertoire required for studio or recital performance; several comparative texts used; additional study materials on reserve; syllabus and schedule of assignments emailed

    …new diction workbooks for all courses added in Spring 2007 (newly published material)

    MUS 4930 Readings and Conferences

    ADDED Seminar in Spring 2007: Accompanying Seminar; team taught w/Ben Salisbury

    Wednesdays 2:30-3:30 – piano students accompanying recitals receive individual coaching as collaborative instruction with singers and instrumentalists (by student request)

    PROFESSOR MORRISON

    For MUSC 3730, 2770, and 1720, I began requiring a weekly studio class in 2004. Beginning Fall 2007, that class will actually appear in the schedule book in addition to the TBA time for the individual lesson.

    For MUSC 2700 and 2710, we have adopted a new textbook (effective Fall 2006). The new text is the teacher's edition of Standard of Excellence, and is a book that many teachers use as a beginning method book for their band classes in the public schools.

    MUSC 4930 was approved last year (2006) as CI course; this class is an expansion of the pedagogy course that I used to teach under the readings and conferences number. I did this in response to student concerns that wind and percussion performance majors couldn't complete the CI requirement within the major.

    PROFESSOR ROHRER

    MUSC 3240 (Instrumental Methods). I added GIA's Instrumental Score Reading workbook to the class in response to the need for more score-reading skill on the soon-to-be implemented Music Content knowledge exam of the Praxis that Utah will use for certifying music teachers.

    The book includes over fifty error-detection examples with an accompanying CD that we progress through as a new part of the class in spring semester, 2007.

    Also in this semester, I include copies of past daily quizzes on the internet for students to run off and practice as they wish.

    In spring semester, 2007, I began presenting lectures with Powerpoint, using the projector shared by the instrumental faculty (we need projectors in classrooms!)

    MUSC 4240 (Advanced Instrumental Conducting): This was a new course in Fall, 2004. It includes a accompanying ensemble under separate course number. Students in their final semester conduct the live ensemble at each class toward concerts at the middle and end of the semester on secondary and major instruments, respectively. This capstone class for instrumental music education majors includes a literature component and continued score study and analysis techniques. In fall 2005, I added detailed evaluation sheets for each session that encourage students to self evaluate their own videotapes before each rehearsal. A lesson plan component was added in fall 2006.

    MUSC 2800 (High Brass Techniques): This a course, the likes of which I have taught for 15 years, but I added a strategy in spring 2006 of mouthpiece buzzing as a major focus that I carried into applied trumpet (MUSC 1810, 2850, 3810). It has developed an improved sense of pitch and purity of sound along with flexibility.

    MUSC 2720, 4700 (Marching Band, Wind Orchestra & Band operations): In summer, 2005, I was given the password to design and update daily an extensive bands website that is used for posting daily rehearsals (so marching band students across campus can check plans without coming to the music building). It is also centerpiece for communication for recruiting and upcoming events in the band area.

    FRY STREET QUARTET

    2006-2007 String Area program/course modifications

    course changes:

    • studio class "swaps" – teachers teach another teacher's studio twice per semester
    • "sculpting sound" in the art museum – student chamber music masterclasses conducted for the public in the Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art, team-taught by entire string faculty

    objectives:

    • To give students more contact with the entire string faculty (before, the contact was primarily with the private teacher, and the only access to other faculty came with their chamber music teacher)
    • To create more opportunities for students to practice performing in public settings
    • To give students a chance to hear each other's performances, and to learn by observing other students as they are taught. Each young artist can greatly influence the others by demonstrating their progress and how they respond to different learning situations.
    • To draw inspiration from other art forms within the Caine School of the Arts
    • To expand the "audience" for classical music on the USU campus

    to create larger audiences for our students' performances, giving them real life experiences from the stage with audiences

    to enrich the USU experience for the entire campus community

    to expand the profile and visibility of the USU Music Department

    2005-2006 String Area program/course modifications:

    1. entrance auditions for the string program modifications:

    additional repertoire, more repertoire required (including technical studies) higher degree of difficulty, and memorization required

    objectives: These audition requirement changes were in response to a larger, more talented pool of auditionees due to increased recruiting efforts and reputation of the program

    1. Requirements for participation in string program (study with a faculty teacher):

    To increase the commitment to serious study within the program, and in response to the new level of applicants, participation in the string area has been generally limited (with occasional exceptional cases) to:

    • Students who have declared a major in String Music Education and/or String Performance
    • Students who fully participate in the entire program, and maintain exemplary attendance and grades in the following courses:
    • studio classes
    • orchestra
    • chamber music (string ensemble)
    • extra string area events, masterclasses, guest artists, and concerts

    PROFESSOR TIMMONS

    2005-06

    Flute Studio: MUSC 1700,2750,3710:

    Began using recorded accompaniments from SmartMusic.

    MUSC 3260: Began a component to examine web-based music education resources.

    2006-07

    Flute Studio: MUSC 1700,2750,3710:

    Directed students to online flute pages, fingering charts, webpages, etc.

    MUSC 2700 Woodwind Techniques 1:

    Piloted use of new text that includes CD accompaniment and full band scores to address issues that most teachers will be concerned with in an instrumental teaching situations. Some

    MUSC 3260: Put course on WebCT to avoid printing packet and begin to implement electronic quizzes and access to materials and other resources. Currently developing online course for distance delivery.

    • The Manon Caine Russell Kathryn Caine Wanlass Performance Hall opened January 2006.
                   
    A. Objectives Common to All Professional Baccalaureate Degrees

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    1.

    piano proficiency

    2. music  history

    3. music theory and aural skills

    4. music technology

    5. conducting skills

    6. skills on major instrument

     

    1110

     

     

    x

     

     

     

     

    1120

     

     

    x

     

     

     

     

    1130

     

     

    x

     

     

     

     

    1140

     

     

    x

     

     

     

     

    1150

    x

     

     

     

     

     

     

    1160

    x

     

     

     

     

     

     

    2120

     

     

    x

     

     

     

     

    2130

     

     

    x

     

     

     

     

    2150

     

     

    x

     

     

     

     

    2160

     

     

    x

     

     

     

     

    2180

     

     

     

    x

     

     

     

    2350

     

     

     

     

    x

     

     

    2600

     

     

     

     

    x

     

     

    3110

     

    x

     

     

     

     

     

    3140

     

     

    x

     

     

     

     

    3180

     

     

     

    x

     

     

     

    3190

     

    x

     

     

     

     

     

    3220

     

     

     

     

    x

     

     

    3230

     

     

     

     

    x

     

     

    3240

     

     

     

     

    x

     

     

    3400

     

     

     

     

     

    x

     

    3440

     

     

     

     

     

    x

     

    3500

     

     

     

     

    x

     

     

    3550

     

     

     

     

     

    x

     

    3590

     

     

     

     

    x

     

     

    3670

     

     

     

     

     

    x

     

    3710

     

     

     

     

     

    x

     

    3720

     

     

     

     

     

    x

     

    3730

     

     

     

     

     

    x

     

    3740

     

     

     

     

     

    x

     

    3750

     

     

     

     

     

    x

     

    3760

     

     

     

     

    x

     

     

    3770

     

     

     

     

    x

     

     

    3790

     

     

     

     

    x

     

     

    3810

     

     

     

     

     

    x

     

    3820

     

     

     

     

     

    x

     

    3830

     

     

     

     

     

    x

     

    3840

     

     

     

     

     

    x

     

    3860

     

     

     

     

     

    x

     

    3870

     

     

     

     

    x

     

     

    4210

     

     

    x

     

     

     

     

    4240

     

     

     

     

    x

     

     

    4510

     

     

     

     

     

    x

     

    4520

     

     

     

     

     

    x

     

    4530

     

     

     

     

     

    x

     

    4540

     

     

     

     

     

    x

     

    4600

     

     

     

     

    x

     

     

    4650

     

     

     

     

    x

     

     

    4700

     

     

     

     

    x

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    B. Additional Objectives to Music Education

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    1

    2

    3

    4

    5

    6

     

    2700

     

     

     

     

    x

     

     

    2800

    x

     

     

     

     

    x

     

    3100

    x

    x

    x

    x

    x

    x

     

    3220

    x

    x

    x

    x

    x

    x

     

    3240

    x

    x

    x

    x

    x

    x

     

    4240

     

     

    x

     

    x

    x

     

    Orff

     

     

     

    x

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    C. Additional Objectives to Music Therapy

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    1

    2

    3

    4

    5

    6

    7

    1310

     

     

    x

     

     

     

     

    1320

    x

    x

     

     

     

     

     

    2310

     

     

     

     

    x

     

     

    2320

    x

    x

     

     

     

     

     

    3310

     

    x

     

     

     

     

     

    3310

     

     

     

     

    x

     

     

    3320

     

     

     

    x

     

     

     

    3330

    x

    x

     

     

     

    x

    x

    4310

     

    x

     

     

    x

     

     

    4320

     

     

     

     

     

    x

     

    4330

     

     

    x

     

     

     

    x

    4340

     

     

     

     

     

    x

    x


     
    Results of the Program and Means for Evaluating Results


    The Bachelor of Music Degree in Performance is intended to prepare those wishing to combine careers in part or full-time performance and teaching. Many go on to graduate studies and excel in fine graduate programs. Some graduates from recent years have been accepted into the following graduate schools

    Graduate School
    University of North Texas
    University of Southern Cal
    University of Colorado-Boulder
    University of Houston-Texas
    Northwestern University-Illinois
    Eastman School of Music-New York
    Manhattan School of Music-New York
    New England Conservatory-Massachusetts
    University of Utah-Utah
    University of Indiana
    The Juilliard School
    Boston Conservatory
    Metropolitan Opera Apprentice
    School of Music--Rice University
    Ohio State University
    Northern Arizona University
    Cincinnati Conservatory
    Northern Colorado
    University of Kentucky, Lexington

    2009 Employment Education Survey Results

    number of respondents: 15

    Graduate's plans for the Employment 73.3%
    year following graduation Additional Education 20.0%
      Stay at home with children 13.3%
      Volunteer Service 6.7%
      Military Service 0.0%

     

    Note: Percentages don't sum to 100% because some graduates plan to engage in more than one activity.

    If additional education is  Full-time 100.0%
    planned, it will be: Part-time 0.0%

     

    If additional education is planned, Masters 66.7%
    what degree: Doctorate 0.0%
      Second Bachelors 0.0%
      Professional (medical, law) 33.3%
      Other, no degree 0.0%

     

    If the graduate has a job, Full-Time 50.0%
    it is or will be: Part-Time 50.0%

     

    Is the job related to  Yes 57.1%
    the graduate's degree? Somewhat 28.6%
      No 14.3%

     

    In what sector Government Agency 14.3%
    will the graduate be working? Education (public or private) 28.6%
      Business or industry 28.6%
      Other 28.6%

     

    Is the graduate's  yes 42.9%
    job located in Utah? no 57.1%

     

    Is the graduate currently looking yes 35.7%
    for a full-time job? no 64.3%

    Individual performance is evaluated through grades in individual courses, through jury examinations (see Jury Data under Data Indicating Student Progress), through Sophomore Barrier Juries (vocal area only), and the Senior Recital. Performance majors must meet performance standards of an advanced nature, tailored to each particular instrument or voice.


    Proficiency in teaching is evaluated through grades in individual courses, through faculty observations of a student's teaching activities, particularly in individual lessons, but in the case of those in the piano emphasis, in courses for young people in Theory, History, Ear Training, Form and Analysis, and Creative Listening.


    Performance majors must meet proficiency requirements in each area. Most students pass these evaluations the first time. About 10% of those ultimately graduating repeat one or more parts of the evaluation process. Others make voluntary changes in their educational and career plans when they encounter difficulty in the evaluation process.

    Assessment data based on the rubric developed by the Department of Music
    during the 2008-09 academic year will be collected during AY 2009-10 and
    will be added following the 2009-10 academic year.
       


    Measures of Success in Teaching


    The quality of performance teaching is reflected in the accomplishments of students of the Music faculty. Students in percussion have won prizes in state and regional percussion performance competitions. Wind, String, and Percussion students have gone on to advanced training in performance, some at graduate schools (Indiana, University of North Texas, Arizona State, etc.) some with private teachers, and are performing regularly in free-lance settings, and part-time professional and semi-professional orchestras, chamber ensembles and combos, in connection with teaching and other musical activities.


    Vocalists have won prizes in state NATS competitions, in state and regional Metropolitan Opera competitions, and have won lucrative fellowships and graduate assistantships at graduate schools. Some have been employed in summer apprentice programs with regional opera companies. Others have continued their training with private teachers. Many are employed as private voice instructors.


    Guitar students are extremely successful in obtaining or creating lucrative employment which includes regular performance at receptions, dinners, other celebrations, and in night spots, combined with teaching individual and group classes.


    Piano students have been superbly successful in winning large numbers of competitions, including the Utah State Fair Piano Competition, (the premier state-wide piano competition), Utah Symphony Salute to Youth auditions, state, regional and national MTNA competitions, the 45th Annual Kosciuszko International Chopin Competition, the National Stillman-Kelly Competition, the International Junior Gina Bachauer Competition, and the International Stravinsky Piano Competition. They have also gone on for highly successful graduate study at Eastman, Juilliard, Indiana, USC, and other fine schools.


    Virtually all graduates in performance also serve as teachers in one situation or another, including studio, home, and college/university teaching.

     

    Results of the Program Related to its Objectives and Means for Evaluating Those Results.


    The Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts Degrees in Music Therapy are intended to prepare students for a professional career as a Board Certified Music Therapist. It is expected that graduates of the program have developed the knowledge and skills which are essential in performing the duties of a professional Music Therapist. General music knowledge and abilities (i.e., musicianship, performance, etc.) are evaluated as described under the requirements for all music majors. The effectiveness of the Music Therapy degree program in producing competent music therapists can be evaluated at four levels: (1) successful completion of the academic program prior to internship; (2) successful completion of the Clinical Internship; (3) the granting of Board Certification status through successful completion of the National CBMT exam; and (4) the success of graduates either in obtaining professional employment or in entering graduate programs.


    1. Successful Completion of the Academic Program Prior to Internship.

    2. Successful Completion of the Clinical Internship.


    All Music Therapy students must complete a Clinical Internship at an AMTA approved clinical training site. The Music Therapy Clinical Training Director and the student each submit 3-month and 6-month evaluations of the student's work during the six-month internship. Successful completion of the clinical internship demonstrates that an AMTA approved Clinical Training Director (not associated with the USU program) has 1) evaluated the Music Therapy student's competencies; 2) has recommended that they have completed the requirements for graduation; and 3) determined that they are eligible to sit for the CBMT Examination.


    All music therapy majors have successfully completed their six-month clinical internships in approved settings throughout the country.


    1. The Granting of Board Certification Status Through Successful Completion of the National CBMT Exam. The Certification Board for Music Therapists (CBMT) was incorporated in May of 1983 to advance the profession of Music Therapy by developing a national certification program for Music Therapists. The board is an independent body that establishes policies, procedures, and standards for certification in the field of Music Therapy. The granting of Board Certification status to Music Therapists (MT-BC) recognizes professional competence at the entry level.


    USU graduates have maintained the outstanding record of 100 percent passage on the National Board Certification Exam


    1. The Success of Graduates Either in Obtaining Professional Employment or in Entering Graduate Studies


    During the past five years (2002-2006, inclusive), fifty-one Music Therapy students completed their on-campus academic studies at Utah State University. Presently, six of these students are completing clinical internships in music therapy; eleven are working as full-time professional music therapists; thirteen are employed part-time doing contractual music therapy work; five are employed in related work settings (schools, facilities for the developmentally disabled, assisted care centers, etc.); four have entered graduate school (two of which are also amongst those working full-time as a professional music therapist); one has completed a Master's Degree in Counseling at the University of Phoenix; one is choosing not to seek employment at this time. Two of these graduates, in addition to entering graduate school, have also established a contractural music therapy business in the greater Salt Lake City, Utah area, which employs five music therapists and works cooperatively with Utah State University to offer a University Affiliated Clinical Internship in Music Therapy that is specifically for students of Utah State University. We have no current information on ten of these graduates.

     

    Results of the Program and Means for Evaluating Results


    The Bachelor of Music Degree in Music Education is intended to prepare qualified instrumental and vocal teachers for service in secondary schools, and, with the Dual Certification option, also in elementary schools. It is expected that each graduate will become proficient in musicianship, individual performance, and teaching skills. Proficiency in basic musicianship is evaluated through grades in individual courses. Individual performance is evaluated through grades in individual courses, through jury examinations, and through the Senior Recital. Qualifications for licensure are determined through successful application for the Secondary Teacher Education Program through the USU College of Education before the Junior Year.  Proficiency in teaching is evaluated through grades in individual courses, through faculty observations of a student's teaching activities in individual lessons, section rehearsals, and large group rehearsals, micro teaching in the public schools through apprenticeship course, culminating in the student teaching experience during the senior year.


    These evaluations indicate that before graduation, Music Education majors meet proficiency requirements in each area. Most students pass these evaluations the first time. About 10% of those ultimately graduating repeat one or more parts of the evaluation process. Others make voluntary changes in their educational and career plans when they encounter difficulty in the evaluation process.


    Broader evaluation of the results of the program are included in the following observations:


    1. The Utah State Office of Education evaluation team accreditation of the USU Music Department teacher education program leading to the Bachelor of Music Degree in Music Education, fully meets state requirements and expectations.

    2. NCATE Accreditation every five years.

    3. All Music Education graduates who seek employment find positions in secondary or elementary school settings. Among them are directors of some of the finest urban and rural school music programs in the region. Several, after earning graduate degree, have found positions in colleges and universities.

    Bachelor of Music in Piano Pedagogy

    Assessment of Strengths and Weaknesses of the Program.

    Strengths


    The presence of the Youth Conservatory (YC) in connection to the pedagogy program is a great strength. There are over 225 pre-college students involved in the program and 23 student teachers as well as 15 professional teachers. This provides an actual situation for students to observe experienced teachers teach real students, have their teaching and their students evaluated, and perform themselves in conservatory recitals. The Conservatory program has become a model for the state and Intermountain area. The Piano Program has attracted students from California, Nevada, Washington, Arizona, Colorado and Idaho, as well as Hawaii, Canada, Korea, Italy, Russia and China.


    Graduates in the program have gone on to higher degrees, obtained jobs, or started their own independent studios with financial success.

    Other Data Indicating Student Progress and Success

    Performance Juries

    As listed on the Department's Assessment Grid, one method of evaluating information about students on-going progress is through the individual performance juries conducted each semester. Data for Spring 2004 and Fall 2004 by performance area are presented below.

    JURY SUMMARY - FALL 05

     

    AREA FROS FROS SOPH SOPH JR JR SR SR TOT TOT  
      PASS FAIL PASS FAIL PASS FAIL PASS FAIL PASS FAIL  
    PIANO 8 0 9 0 5 0 6 0 28 0  
    ORGAN 0 0 3 0 3 0 0 0 6 0  
    FLUTE 2 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 5 0  
    CLAR 2 0 2 0 1 0 2 0 7 0  
    OBOE 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0  
    SAX 3 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 5 0  
    BRASS 1 0 2 0 3 0 3 0 9 0  
    PERC 2 0 2 0 0 0 1 0 5 0  
    STRING 2 0 7 0 8 0 4 0 21 0  
    GUITAR 3 0 5 0 5 0 5 0 18 0  
    VOICE 14 1 11 2 13 2 6 0 44 5  
    TOTALS 40 1 44 2 40 2 29 0 153 5  

     

     

    JURY SUMMARY - SPRING 06

    AREA FROS FROS SOPH SOPH JR JR SR SR TOT TOT  
      PASS FAIL PASS FAIL PASS FAIL PASS FAIL PASS FAIL  
    PIANO 6 1 7 0 6 1 5   24 2  
    ORGAN 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0  
    FLUTE 1 0 0 1 2 0 2 0 5 1  
    Bassoon 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0  
    CLAR 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 3  
    OBOE 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0  
    SAX 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0  
    BRASS 2 0 1 0 4 0 2 0 9 0  
    PERC 2 0 2 0 1 0 0 0 5 0  
    STRING 2 0 7 0 6 0 5 0 20 0  
    GUITAR 4 0 3 0 5 0 5 0 17 0  
    VOICE 18 3 4 0 7 0 7 1 36 4  
    TOTALS 38 5 23 2 30 1 27 2 123 10  

     

    JURY SUMMARY - FALL 06

    AREA FROS FROS SOPH SOPH JR JR SR SR TOT TOT  
      PASS FAIL PASS FAIL PASS FAIL PASS FAIL PASS FAIL  
    PIANO 9 1 8 1 5 0 5 0 27 2  
    FLUTE 1 1 1 0 0 0 3 1 5 2  
    CLAR 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 3 1  
    OBOE 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1  
    SAX 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 3 2  
    BRASS 4 0 1 0 4 0 2 0 11 0  
    PERC 2 0 2 0 2 0 1 0 7 0  
    STRING 15 0 7 0 10 0 8 0 40 0  
    GUITAR 8 0 6 0 3 0 6 0 23 0  
    VOICE 20 0 21 0 12 0 7 0 60 0  
    TOTALS 61 3 49 2 37 2 33 1 180 8  

     

    Jury Summary Spring 2007

    AREA FROS FROS SOPH SOPH JR JR SR SR TOT TOT  
      PASS FAIL PASS FAIL PASS FAIL PASS FAIL PASS FAIL  
    PIANO 10 1 5 0 5 0 3 0 23 1  
    WDWND 6 0 4 1 3 1 3 0 16 2  
    BRASS 4 0 3 0 4 0 2 0 13 0  
    PERC 1 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 5 0  
    STRING 15 0 7 0 10 0 8 0 40 0  
    GUITAR 5 0 4 0 3 0 6 0 23 0  
    VOICE 22 0 14 1 4 0 2 0 42 1  
    TOTALS 61 3 39 2 31 1 24 0 162 4  

     

    Jury Summary Fall 2007 

    AREA FROS FROS SOPH SOPH JR JR SR SR TOT TOT  
      PASS FAIL PASS FAIL PASS FAIL PASS FAIL PASS FAIL  
    PIANO 10 1 5 0 5 0 3 0 23 1  
    WDWND 9 2 2 3 2 1 4 2 17 8  
    BRASS 7 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 11 0  
    PERC 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 4 0  
    STRING 13 0 12 0 4 0 11 0 40 0  
    GUITAR 5 0 4 0 3 0 6 0 23 0  
    VOICE 22 0 14 1 4 0 2 0 42 1  
    TOTALS 66 3 42 4 21 1 26 2 160 10  

     

    Jury Summary Spring 2008

    AREA FROS FROS SOPH SOPH JR JR SR SR TOT TOT  
      PASS FAIL PASS FAIL PASS FAIL PASS FAIL PASS FAIL  
    PIANO 13 0 3 0 5 0 6 0 27 0  
    WDWND 8 4 4 0 1 4 2 0 15 8  
    BRASS 10 1 3 0 0 0 2 0 13 1  
    PERC 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 4 0  
    STRING 10 0 12 0 3 0 18 0 43 0  
    GUITAR 4 0 4 0 3 0 7 0 18 0  
    VOICE 18 0 11 2 9 2 0 0 38 4  
    TOTALS 63 5 39 2 23 6 35 0 158 13  

     

    Jury Summary Fall 2008

    AREA FROS FROS SOPH SOPH JR JR SR SR TOT TOT  
      PASS FAIL PASS FAIL PASS FAIL PASS FAIL PASS FAIL  
    PIANO 9 1 12 0 7 0 1 0 29 1  
    WDWND 11 1 6 2 5 0 3 1 25 4  
    BRASS 4 0 1 0 3 0 1 0 9 0  
    PERC 5 0 1 0 4 0 1 0 11 0  
    STRING 16 0 9 0 13 0 3 0 41 0  
    GUITAR 6 1 3 0 5 0 5 0 19 1  
    VOICE 18 0 11 2 9 2 0 0 38 4  
    TOTALS 69 3 43 4 46 2 14 1 172 10  

     

    Jury Summary Spring 2009

    AREA FROS FROS SOPH SOPH JR JR SR SR TOT TOT  
      PASS FAIL PASS FAIL PASS FAIL PASS FAIL PASS FAIL  
    PIANO 6 0 9 0 6 0 2 0 23 0  
    WDWND 7 5 5 1 1 0 2 0 15 6  
    BRASS 4 0 1 0 3 0 1 0 9 0  
    PERC 5 0 1 0 4 0 1 0 11 0  
    STRING 13 0 5 0 15 0 3 0 36 0  
    GUITAR 6 0 4 0 5 0 6 0 21 0  
    VOICE 18 0 11 2 9 2 0 0 38 4  
    TOTALS 59 5 36 3 43 2 15 0 153 10  

     

     

    Placements, Board Exams & Competitions

    Measures of the program's success include job and graduate school placements, success on a national board certification exam, and honors received by students in competition with students from other institutions.

    * The most recent placement and advancement information from the 2003-04 USU Placement Survey indicates that 100% of music major graduates had obtained employment related to their degree or were enrolled in graduate studies. 72% of music therapy graduates had obtained employment related to their degree or were enrolled in graduate studies (two were not seeking employment).

    * One hundred percent of the music therapy graduates passed the National Board Certification Exam.

    * Students from various programs within the Department continue to receive top honors in state, regional, national and international competitions. (See Measures of Success in Teaching under Bachelor of Music in Performance.)

    National Association of Schools of Music Reaccreditation Visit

    The information below relates to the department's most recent NASM reaccreditation visit in 2001.  This information will be updated as part of the upcoming NASM visit in 2011.

     

    The Music Department underwent a rigorous reaccreditation visit by the National Association of Schools of Music (NASM) during Spring 2001. Self assessment procedures carried out by the Department were reported in a comprehensive self study developed for this reaccreditation activity. The on-site visitors were two music department administrators selected by the NASM for their background training and expertise in evaluating university music programs.


    OUTCOMES OF EXTERNAL REVIEW BY THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATON OF SCHOOLS MUSIC REACCREDITATION TEACH


    The information presented in the NASM Self Study Report is the result of four years of periodic evaluation and planning efforts in preparation for the University's Reaccreditation by the Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges in 1996, conversion to the semester calendar in 1998, and the present NASM Reaccreditation visit and Board of Regents Review. The periodic reviews of the Department's Mission Statement and objectives by the faculty from April 1996 until the present year, and the resultant modifications were previously documented in this Self Study in IA. Pages from the NASM Handbook providing guidelines for professional degrees and the integration of music from diverse cultures were initially disseminated to faculty and discussed during the Department's Fall Faculty Retreat Meeting on September 19, 1996. This was done so that subsequent discussions and decisions related to evaluation and planning matters would be consistent with NASM Guidelines in anticipation of this NASM Reaccreditation Visit.


    While this report was primarily developed by the department head and the music faculty, it includes input over the past two years from students in a variety of settings (e.g., Student Advisory Council meetings, conferences with individual students and student groups, exit surveys with graduating seniors), department office staff, library staff, and college administrators. Faculty members, both individually and in groups, wrote the descriptions and evaluations of specific degree programs. Needs for improvement and descriptions of Department strengths have their source in faculty meeting discussions, in conversations with individual faculty members, in the deliberations of the department head and assistant department heads, and in the observations of the music department head. The actual writing and editing of the report was done chiefly by the department head, with valuable assistance from the Department's office staff. Draft copies of the report were made available for review and correction prior to completing the report.


    The Self Study is a thorough and detailed description and analysis of our current status. It lists and prioritizes our needs and future challenges. The report will serve as a reference document, particularly in dealing with these needs and challenges, and will help keep our efforts focused on the issues which are most likely to determine our future, and to remind us of smaller details which need to be addressed in refining our programs.


    The following summarizes the visiting evaluators findings regarding the Music Department's strengths and weaknesses and serves as a comprehensive assessment of the Department for this year's assessment report.
    Utah State University
    Department of Music


    Report of the Visiting Evaluators


    Overview, Summary Assessment, Recommendations for the Program Overall Strengths:


    1. A talented and dedicated faculty who consistently demonstrate a commitment to student learning and who share a common purpose.

      2 . Focused curricula, especially in music therapy and music education, which are clearly central to the mission of the university and the College of Humantities, Arts, and Social Sciences and provide the state of Utah with trained professionals in these vital areas.


    3 . Significant support for the School of the Arts and the Department of Music from the President, Provost and Dean.


    4 . Emerging university commitment to fund-raising and development that will have a significant impact on the educational mission of the university. One of the dramatic changes is the existence of a resident String Quartet that has had a major impact on the music program.


    5 . A dedicated Department Head who is an effective leader and advocate for the department and who has
    the respect and support of the administration and faculty.


    6 . Significant support from, and interaction with, the Logan community, including faculty and student presence in the local schools and other musical entities. This interaction includes hosting a remarkable Youth Conservatory Program.


    7 . A dedicated music student body, that includes a cadre of highly-talented and committed student performers.


    8 . Consistently strong teaching in applied music. A consistent and remarkable high level of achievement in student performance is especially evident in the piano area.


    9 . A succinct, accurate, and well-prepared Self-Study.


    10 . A commitment to on-going infusion of technology into all music curricula.


    Short-Term Improvements:


    1. Additional faculty office/studios, practice rooms, rehearsal space, classrooms, and new performance venue are needed and would have a very positive impact on student learning and the educational experience.

    2. Faculty workloads that are consistently above national averages even for institutions that place a high priority on effective teaching.

    3. An additional full-time faculty position is needed in music history including world musics.

    4. The department should broaden their method of providing an archive of recordings of selected faculty and student performances.

    5. Music faculty salaries that are lower than the university average and lower than comparable institutions in the west.


    Primary Future Issues:


    1. Continue new focus on fund-raising and development.
    2. Address issues related, in part, to the increase in music major enrollment, including faculty workloads and facilities.
    3. Need to develop strategies for additional equipment needs.
    4. Need to address the means to purchase additional pianos.
    5. Need to address faculty salary inequities.

    Long Term Issues:

    1. Work with the college and university administration to consider expanding the curricula to include graduate degrees in areas such as music education, music therapy, piano and guitar, and interdisciplinary courses with other departments as appropriate.
    2. Work with the college and university administration to develop a plan to address facilities needs.

     

    RUBRICS.pdf